Political Awakening and the 1931 Uprising in Kashmir


The 1931 Uprising and the Political Awakening in Kashmir

The 1931 Uprising and the Political Awakening in Kashmir
Political Awakening and the Uprising 1931


The 1931 uprising in Kashmir was a historic event that changed the course of Kashmir’s history. It was the first large-scale protest against the Dogra rule, and it marked the start of a new era of political awakening in Kashmir. It had significant outcomes, such as the emergence of the All Jammu and Kashmir Muslim Conference, the introduction of limited self-government, the awareness of the Kashmiri people’s struggle, and the foundation for the eventual independence of Kashmir. In this blog post, we will understand how it started and what were it's causes and Consequences. 


How did the uprising start?

The uprising started with the arrest of Abdul Qadir, a non-Kashmiri Muslim who had been preaching against the Dogra government. On July 13, 1931, thousands of people gathered outside the Central Jail in Srinagar, where Qadir was being detained. The police fired at the crowd, killing 21 people and injuring many others. The killing led to widespread anger and protests across the kashmir valley. And demanded justice and then a commission was appointed known as Glancy Commission to investigate the incident and give some recommendations. 

What were the reasons behind the uprising?

The 1931 uprising in Kashmir was a result of various factors. Some of the main reasons behind the uprising include:

  • Discrimination against Muslims: The Dogra rulers were mainly Hindu, and they discriminated against Muslims in various fields, such as government jobs, education, and land rights. This created a sense of injustice and resentment among Muslims, which motivated them to join the political awakening.
  • High taxes: The Dogra rulers imposed heavy taxes on the people of Kashmir, which made their lives difficult. This caused widespread poverty and misery, which increased the anger and frustration of the people of Kashmir.
  • Poor working conditions: The working conditions in Kashmir were very poor, and many workers were exploited by their employers. This led to a lot of dissatisfaction and discontent, which prepared the ground for the uprising.
  • Lack of democracy: The Dogra rulers were a hereditary monarchy, and there was no democracy in Kashmir. This meant that the people of Kashmir had no voice in their own affairs, which made them feel alienated and oppressed by the Dogra rulers.
  • The arrest of Abdul Qadir: Abdul Qadir was a non-Kashmiri Muslim who had been inspiring people to revolt against the Dogra rule. His arrest triggered the uprising, as it was seen as a sign of the Dogra rulers’ tyranny and repression of the people of Kashmir.

What were the outcomes of the uprising?

The uprising had a significant impact on the political scenario of Kashmir. It led to the emergence of the All Jammu and Kashmir Muslim Conference, which became the dominant political force in the state. It also compelled the Dogra government to make some reforms, such as introducing limited self-government for the people of Kashmir. Some of the major outcomes of the uprising include:

  • Emergence of the All Jammu and Kashmir Muslim Conference: The All Jammu and Kashmir Muslim Conference was established in 1932 by Sheikh Abdullah, a prominent leader of the uprising. The party represented the interests of the Kashmiri Muslims, and it demanded the end of the Dogra rule and the creation of a democratic and secular state in Kashmir.
  • Introduction of limited self-government: The Dogra government realized that it could not suppress the uprising by force, and it decided to make some changes to appease the people of Kashmir. In 1934, it introduced the Praja Sabha, a legislative assembly that had some elected members from the people of Kashmir. However, the Praja Sabha had limited authority, and it was still controlled by the Dogra rulers and their supporters.
  • Awareness of the Kashmiri people’s struggle: The 1931 uprising brought the Kashmiri people’s struggle for freedom and self-determination to the notice of the world. It also influenced other independence movements in the region, such as the Quit India Movement in India, which was launched in 1942 by Mahatma Gandhi and other leaders of the Indian National Congress.
  • Foundation for the eventual independence of Kashmir: The 1931 uprising was the first step in the long and turbulent journey of the Kashmiri people towards independence. It marked the start of a new era of political awakening in the state, and it helped to create a strong sense of identity and unity among the Kashmiri people.

Conclusion

The 1931 uprising in Kashmir was a watershed moment in the history of the state. It was the first large-scale protest against the Dogra rule, and it marked the start of a new era of political awakening in Kashmir. It started with the arrest of Abdul Qadir, a non-Kashmiri Muslim who had been preaching against the Dogra government. It had various reasons, such as discrimination against Muslims, high taxes, poor working conditions, lack of democracy, and the arrest of Abdul Qadir. It had significant outcomes, such as the emergence of the All Jammu and Kashmir Muslim Conference, the introduction of limited self-government, the awareness of the Kashmiri people’s struggle, and the foundation for the eventual independence of Kashmir. The 1931 uprising was a historic event that changed the course of Kashmir’s history.

Athar Maqsood

Woking as an Author and Writer since 2020.
Education :
Bachelor in Political Science and Economics. Diploma in Computer Science, Tally, and Typing.

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